That Curt Schilling protects his daughter thing

If you’re not familiar with what happened, Curt Schilling (who holds the type of politics and weird-ass beliefs about science that make my head want to explode) congratulated his daughter who is off to college to play softball. No big, right?

Except, y’know, that meant the usual vile set of rape and death threats came along, except this time instead of being aimed at a woman, they were aimed at her father – just using her as the token. And you know what, they’re awful and revolting and make you despair for humankind. Just like these threats always do. They weren’t new or inventive, but instead of being aimed at upsetting and shuttingup a woman, they were aimed at upsetting her Dad. For the lulz, AFAICT.

And then, this is where it gets interesting. Curt Schilling publishes some of the more vile comments by some of the people who kept at it, identifies them, calls them out and boom – all of a sudden they’re gone from the internet, sacked from their jobs and lost their sports scholarships. In 24 hours.

While there’s a large part of my that’s going ‘huzzah, fucking finally!’, there’s another large part of me that is so hugely frustrated that I don’t know if I’m going to finish writing before my head explodes.

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That TV thing

I’ve seen two things that have kicked off my desire to talk about this. One is Netball Australia paying for Free-To-Air TV coverage[1], following the budget cuts at SBS and their subsequent decision to stop putting netball on.  Another is Chris Coleman’s rumour-mill (so it’s going to be a pretty damn solid rumour for Chris to be putting it out in public) about an ABL team – not the league – putting together some sort of deal with the support of a sponsor (maybe Government?) for their games to be broadcast on a Pay TV network somewhere.  Add this to the upheaval when the AIHL got their finals onto Fox and then decided (and rapidly undecided) to kill the livestream of the event and I’m hopelessly interested in the place and purpose of getting sport on TV.

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